The Djinn by Marie Morin

Elise Beauchamp is still trying to recover from the death of her husband when she encounters a bonafide djinn. Most people think of I Dream of Jeannie when they hear the word djinn, or the more popular version of genie. But the djinn who appears in her house after she takes the stopper out a perfume bottle she buys at an open-air market is far from nubile, blonde, and female. He is tall, muscular, and devastatingly attractive in an exotic manner. He is also rather annoyed at having been summoned by a human being, regardless of how attractive she is. From there develops a funny and poignant love story between two unlikely lovers.

I liked Elise. She was down to earth, spunky, and really made me feel for her situation as a fairly recent widow who is unsure how to move on after her husband’s demise. I was a little worried the djinn in this book would be of the popular variety: all flash and no substance. Thankfully, Raheem is the powerful being that is the djinn of Middle Eastern folklore. He is also hilarious, exciting, and interesting as a love interest. He has an amusing habit of making Elise’s clothes fall off, at first because he knows it makes her uncomfortable, and eventually because he is more than happy to see her naked.

The story enfolds with Elisa spending the beginning trying to figure out how to send Raheem back to where he belongs and fighting her surprisingly intense attraction to him. He is at first annoyed at the puny human who opened the gateway to his world. However, he soon finds himself intrigued and attracted to the spunky human who is still grieving over her husband who died more than a year ago. Although this is a novella, the story unfolds in a logical fashion and the storyline does not wrap in a manner that felt rushed. You see annoyance turn to love and root for this couple to be together. Morin makes it clear that a djinn being with a human is forbidden, but when do hearts follow rules? The last part of the story is about working out how this couple will be together.

I found this story both hilarious and touching. I wanted to read more, and found myself laughing out loud at some of both Raheem’s and Elise’s actions as they had their little power struggle. I also found myself feeling sadness at Elise’s loss and the tragedy she sees as her job as an EMT. In addition, there is some adventure as an old foe of Raheem, who happens to be a powerful djinn as well, kidnaps Elise to draw Raheem into a fantastic battle to end all battles. I appreciated that Ms. Morin tried to write a story that does include a djinn that reflects the true folkloric backgrounds of the djinn. She put her own spin on it that gave it a different, fresh perspective, which I enjoyed.

Another element I appreciated about this story is that the hero being a djinn didn’t confine this narrative to be one in which the mistress of the djinn spends all her time asking for wishes and seeing them become twisted by the bitter sense of humor of the djinn. There are three wishes granted, and the manner in which they occur add to the story. The sensuality of this story was hot, but Ms. Morin took the time to develop the emotional connection between the characters long before they had their first full love scene.

The Djinn was a fun, interesting read. It took a myth that had long intrigued me and built a romantic story that kept me involved until the end.

Book Stats:
e-book, digital format
Publisher: New Concepts Publishing
Length: Novella
ISBN:
1-58608-377-5

To purchase an electronic copy of The Djinn click here.

Elise Beauchamp is still trying to recover from the death of her husband when she encounters a bonafide djinn. Most people think of I Dream of Jeannie when they hear the word djinn, or the more popular version of genie. But the djinn who appears in her house after she takes the stopper out a …

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About Danielle

Danielle is a stone-cold addict. Of books, that is. She loves to read. Her book collection is in the thousands. Several years ago, she read Night Pleasures by Sherrilyn Kenyon and became a die-hard paranormal fan. The same thing happened with urban fantasy/occult detective stories when she read Guilty Pleasures by Laurell K. Hamilton. Danielle grew up on fairy tales and mythology, so reading excellent urban fantasy which draws from the ancient myths and legends is a joy for her. Her heart goes pitter patter when she hears of an urban fantasy based on some obscure folk legend that most people never heard of. In her real life, she works in the veterinary field, and aspires to one day be a published author. She’s not married and doesn’t have kids, unless you count two spoiled cats. She lives in Texas.

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