Lionsbane by Marteeka Karland

In this semi-futuristic world, humans are now on the bottom of the food chain, preyed upon and protected by other races. Sometimes, the protection offered falters, and people like Jayla are orphaned at the tender age of ten. Her family’s slaughter was at the hands of Lionsblood, lion-like shapeshifters, and they become Jayla’s number one enemy. She spends the next eight years of her life honing her abilities and exacting revenge from the monsters that destroyed her childhood.

Kane is the Lionsblood sworn to protect Jayla and her family from rogue clans like the one that obliterated her former life. He’s followed her for years, continuing to protect her from the others, all the while keeping himself hidden from her. In an attempt to fulfill his duties, however, Kane finds himself at Jayla’s mercy – for there are a few things he needs from her to ensure a happy future. Too bad Jayla hates all Lionsblood with a passion and would rather kill someone like Kane over aiding him in any way.

Lionsbane takes an interesting look into what causes a person to hate someone because of his or her race. Jayla’s hatred is understandable, considering she witnessed major brutality at the hands of the Lionsblood, though it is questionable how she was able to interact in society (even if it was mainly on the outskirts) and not realize the nature of the human/non-human race social structure. For example, she spends years avoiding contact with the farms that are so-called protectors for humans, and yet she has no clue that there might be races and communities that would want to protect people like herself. Assuming her trauma caused her to distrust all Lionsblood on sight, it makes a modicum of sense that she would be stubborn enough to overlook the positives brought about by such symbiotic relationships.

Jayla’s character development is consistent through the first half to three-quarters of the book, at which point, she makes some turn-around decisions that raise questions. Not enough time was spent demonstrating enough reasons for Jayla to reach her ultimate conclusions about Kane, his people, and her future. Kane himself is a highly consistent character, if a little over-the-top, and though the reader may initially question his motives, he remains true to form throughout. Much of my issues with Jayla’s character development have to do with the rushed ending; there simply wasn’t enough time to continue a steady pace to follow her thinking patterns and the story suffered as a result.

Overall, Lionsbane is a good read. Jayla is a strong character, and it’s a relief to find that she hasn’t been quite as alone as she thought she was all those years. I always enjoy reading about heroines who can take care of themselves but could use the help of a good man every now and again – and this is definitely one of those stories. Despite the leaps of logic, this was still a book worth reading, and I look forward to reading the rest of the series.

Book Stats:

  • e-book, digital format
  • Publisher: Changeling Press
  • Book Length: Novella
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 978-1-60521-315-6

To purchase an electronic copy of Lionsbane click here.

Books in the Frozen Earth series in the order they should be read:
Snowbound: Lionsblood
Lionsmate
Lionsbane
Lionsheart

To visit the author’s website go here.

In this semi-futuristic world, humans are now on the bottom of the food chain, preyed upon and protected by other races. Sometimes, the protection offered falters, and people like Jayla are orphaned at the tender age of ten. Her family’s slaughter was at the hands of Lionsblood, lion-like shapeshifters, and they become Jayla’s number one …

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About Elisabeth B.

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