Calling By Jack Brokenshire

In a bar, encased within drunken boredom, he decides to make it look like he’s talking to someone on his cell phone. He punches in a few numbers, take a sip of his drink and looks around the bar, as if to show anybody watching that he’s important and not just some bloke sitting alone in a bar getting trashed. He thinks of his Dad and pushes some numbers on his phone. When the phone starts ringing, he’s mildly surprised, but almost too drunk to care at this point who answers the phone.

The phone is answered and he asks for his Dad. When the person on the other end of the phone tells him to hold on a minute and then his Dad picks up the phone – the world stops in his tracks.

He’s just called his Dad. His Dad who has been dead for over 20 years. He knows he’s drunk, but he can’t possibly be that drunk, right?

Since his Dad died when he was a child, he doesn’t have a lot of memories of him, but is able to reach through this miracle of a cellular phone to talk to him. It worked to talk to his Dad, he wonders if it will work to talk to his Mother – who more recently died. It did. There was some sort of miracle on this particular cellular phone and its carrier. Right? But he’s a regular guy. He has a family, he works as a furniture packer and whose hobby is getting fall-down drunk on a regular basis.

Soon, he’s unable to contain his excitement about this phone and his discovery. He speaks daily with his Mom and his Dad. His Dad urges him not to share this news with anybody, the news becomes too big for him to contain within himself and he shares it with the world.

Once the news is out, it has to be proven. Once it’s proven, the theological debates begin … as does the monetary rewards from people and companies who want to buy the phone, who want to use the phone only once, who want to use his image in their marketing campaigns. As his world begins to spiral out of control, he uses his massive amounts of money to numb himself with drugs and alcohol. But that only seems to make it worse. His world crumbles, his wife and kids run away to hide from all of the media attention and he’s essentially given carte blanche to the world. He has so much money that nothing matters to him. Nothing matters except the memory of his Mother and the fact that she told him that she hated him as she was dying.

Can he wrap his mind around what’s happened to him and his family? How can he possibly find his way out of this dark hole that he’s managed to throw himself into?

Overall, I enjoyed this story. The idea itself was very creative and the execution of the endless number of questions that can arise from it were dealt with in a very good manner. The answers were almost non-answers, giving me – the reader – the chance to impart my own insight into the book, into Heaven and the whole scheme of things.

However, I felt that the story was far too long and the self-destructive nature that our main character faced was repetitive.

Book Stats:

  • e-book, digital format
  • Publisher: Aspen Mountain Press
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 978-1-60168-130-0

To purchase an electronic copy of Calling click here.

In a bar, encased within drunken boredom, he decides to make it look like he’s talking to someone on his cell phone. He punches in a few numbers, take a sip of his drink and looks around the bar, as if to show anybody watching that he’s important and not just some bloke sitting alone …

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